According to some surveys, many men wish they could receive more oral sex from their partners. Whether that means they actually prefer oral sex to intercourse or wherever they simply would like a little more variety in their sex lives is anyone's guess. But whatever the case, there's no denying that most men relish the opportunity to get oral sex. And if a man has been paying proper attention to their penis health, his chances of getting some do increase. But as with all things sexual, there can be some drawbacks. For instance, sometimes a sore penis results from oral sex. If it's nothing but a transient sore penis, there's no problem. But it can be otherwise.

Common causes

Of course, there are many reasons why fallatio could lead to a sore penis – and many of them would fall into the category of basically benign.

For instance, there's the matter of teeth. Oral sex and the mouth are intrinsically linked; a guy can not have one without the other. And most mouths come equipped with teeth (or teeth-like facsimiles). And even the most expert oral sex practitioner may not be able to keep her teeth from grazing the penis, especially the head. When this happens enough, it's bound to result in a sore penis.

In one variation, the partner may playfully nibble on the penis. This may create an ecstatic feeling in some men, but too much nibbling can create breaks in the skin which may lead to a penis ulcer – and that's a bit painful.

But there can be other factors as well. For example, sometimes the partner has not brushed her teeth before giving her favors. Depending on the sensitivity of the penis skin, there could be a reaction to traces of food products in her mouth – such as hot sauce left over from that Mexican dinner. The penal may react unfavorably to such triggers.

Other causes

Not brushing or over-nibbling is forgivable. But there are some other byproducts of oral sex that may not be so easy to shrough off.

While in most cases sex is less likely to pass on sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) from a partner than penetrative sex, there still can be a significant risk. Among the STIs that have been known to be passed on through oral sex are HIV, gonorrhea, syphilis, and chlamydia. All these can be serious for many reasons; a sore penis is among the lesser complications associated with them.

HPV (human papilloma virus) can be transmitted orally as well – although in this case it is the one who is giving the oral sex rather than the one who is receiving it that is at risk. And HPV is strongly associated with an increased chance of developing throat cancer. So men who have HPV should speak with a doctor about whether oral sex is a possibility and what needs to be done.

Other infections that can come about from unprotected oral sex include herpes and hepatitis.

Again, the risk of STIs from oral sex can be lessened by using protective barriers, getting tested regularly and limiting sex partners. Discussion options with a doctor is advised.

Most often oral sex is pleasurable and does not result in a sore penis. When that soreness is due to a little improper handling, use of a superior penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) can help. Soreness can be partially alleviated if the crème contains a combination of exceptional moisturizing agents, such as Shea butter and vitamin E. Try to find a crème that also includes vitamin D, the “miracle vitamin,” which helps fight disease and support cellular function in penal cells. Vitamin D is especially valuable during dark winter months.